That One Time We Bought a House that We Couldn’t Afford

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The truth of the matter is that if we are being honest, we knew we purchased too much home before they could tack the “SOLD!” tag onto the sign in front of the new home. However in practical terms it took us about 7 months to fully comprehend.

Starting Credit Card Debt (01.01.19): $126,310.77
Current Credit Card Debt: $109,570.87
Total Paid Off: $16,739.90
Income Going to Savings: 2%

My wife and I bought a house in June of 2018. We actually bought our 3rd home to be exact. Now before you think I’m some well-to-do, let me tell you a bit about my first two houses…

Our first home was a very modest rambler that was located just a stone’s throw from a Federal Correctional Institution, or in other words… a prison. It was close enough to our home that we could hear the prisoners playing softball on warm summer evenings, and I often took advantage of the way the yard lights illuminated my darkened house to navigate to the bathroom in the middle of the night.

Long before “Orange is the New Black” made prisons chic and hip, people would often asked us, “Aren’t you worried about living that close to a prison? What if someone breaks out?”

My response was always that if someone was going to break out, they sure as hell weren’t going head to the modest rambler a few blocks away and hang out for a month. At most they were going to steal one of our cars to get as far away as possible as quickly as possible.

When we moved into that home, we had a nice retired couple living on one side of us and a young family on the other. Across from us were some well maintained and relatively new duplex apartments, and all of this combined to make our dead-end street a pretty great place for a first home.

Within 3 years however, the retired couple moved to Arizona and sold their home to a rental agency. That agency in turn rented the home to a man who (get this) worked on race cars that he raced at the local race track on weekends. Apparently when you work on race cars, it requires that you rev them up to deafening volumes at all hours of the morning and night, usually while blaring Megadeth or Iron Maiden.

Within a month of this happening, the married couple with the kids on the other side got a divorce, and things went really sideways for the dad. The mom moved out, leaving the teenage kids behind, and the dad began drinking heavily. I know this because he offered to drink with me at least 5 times a week. His 15 year-old son held parties almost every weekend, usually with dad partaking, and we had the pleasure of catching young men standing on his roof peeing on to our roof next door on more than one occasion.

Yup… you read that correctly.Read More »

I May Have Coined My First Inspirational Quote While Going Into Mild Cardiac Arrest

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I make it to the top of the hill, and I am DYING. I’m wheezing, I’m sweating, and one guy cutting logs in his yard asked me to keep the sound of my beating heart down a bit because he couldn’t hear his chainsaw.

Starting Credit Card Debt (01.01.19): $126,310.77
Current Credit Card Debt: $109,570.87
Total Paid Off: $16,739.90
Income Going to Savings: 2%

It’s beautiful here in my neck of the woods right now. Temperatures crest just above 70 degrees, and that’s perfect jogging weather for me.

I never used to be a jogger and I still can’t really say as though I enjoy jogging, but I do like how I feel after a good run. When you’ve hit that “jogging wall” where you feel like you’re going to collapse, you tend to drop into an almost meditative state. At least I do. Half the time I will be running and then suddenly snap back into reality and realize that I’ve covered a couple of miles but don’t really remember much of it at all.

As I’ve said in previous posts, when I exercise I tend to push myself pretty hard. It’s really the only way I know how to properly trick my brain into forgetting about things like finances and credit cards.

So today I was running hard. I had hit about 1.75 miles at an 9 minute mile pace, which isn’t bad considering… well… I’m old.

I rounded a corner of a road I hadn’t run on before, and there in front of me was a gigantic hill. I was exhausted by this point, but I knew if I made it to the top without stopping, it would be roughly 2 miles, and then I could turn around and head back to hit 4 miles in total.

I began charging up the hill. I try to sprint up hills so that I can just get them over with. When I’m coaching youth lacrosse I often tell kids that are running sprints for conditioning, “Remember that the faster you get these over with, the faster you get them over with.” I take this same advice when I’m running up a hill. Why prolong the agony?

I make it to the top of the hill, and I am DYING. I’m wheezing, I’m sweating, and one guy cutting logs in his yard asked me to keep the sound of my beating heart down a bit because he couldn’t hear his chainsaw.

As I paused briefly at the top of the hill before setting out on my return home, it hit me. My first inspirational quote I’ve ever thought of…Read More »